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"The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy. The true neighbor will risk his position, his prestige, and even his life for the welfare of others.”

Martin Luther King Jr

Above all else Sally Duxfield is an Experiential Architect, which is a term that is still sometimes met with a slightly blank stare, so if you read just a little further down this page, she’ll tell you exactly what that means.

Sally’s 30+ years’ experience - including studying neuroscience, leading high performance teams, and owning/directing Makahika Outdoor Pursuits Centre - speak to these favourite things impeccably. In other words, she lives and breathes the things she loves the most. The way life ought to be lived.

Her top three favourite things in life are being outdoors, learning new things, and taking command of a space. So it’s really no surprise that she’s built a career in leadership training (and she’s actually bloody good at it).

Throw in a gorgeous collection of fine gins, a delicious affinity for new shoes, and a wicked amount of sass, and there you have her: Sally Duxfield in all her ineffable glory.

Experiential Architecture can be most succinctly described as the art of connecting theory and strategy with human emotion. Traditionally we have black and white leadership models on one side, and personality assessments on the other. By combining the two, it reinforces our learning, it prompts us to change our habits, and we experience the learning rather than simply reading it. Learning becomes lived, leadership is long-lasting.

How do you commute from the bedroom to work?

Curious question. 

Commuting is a ritual. 

A habit is formed; there is a rhythm; we buy our coffee at a certain place, we sit in a preferred part of the train, often park in a familiar space, in other words, we embed and repeat a process that gets us safely, both physically and mentally from home to our work space. This forms a separation from one environment to another.

  • 5 min read

Why are we so easily distracted?

The fascinating thing about the human brain is that it has a natural bias to be curious about seeking constant and new information. Why? The more information we have, the better we can assess and mitigate danger. But our primal brain is at the crossroads with technology availability as we’ve never experienced it before. And we are exposed to both external distraction (events) and internal distraction (worry or anxiety). We seek constant distraction, but it leads to cognitive overload (overwhelm). Go figure.

  • 7 min read
My Canada Musing - Blokes – Construction – Leadership. Recently I spoke at the NZ Certified Builders conference in Wellington. To be certified, or certifiable; is not generally an aspiration in other parts of our society, however, the folks I met at this conference seemed just fine.
  • 8 min read

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